Enterprise Products

CrowdOptic™ patented technology and proprietary software powers live streaming features and capabilities for the enterprise.


Partners can live stream from a wide range of wearable devices and cameras to a secure, web-based console. The live video stream can be viewed virtually anywhere in the world and pushed to any screen, such as tablets, smartphones, Jumbotrons and televisions, as well as directly to social media. Based on user preferences, live streams can be saved and stored for later use. After the live event, the recorded streams can be transformed into a highlight reel of clips from the event by using the CrowdOptic video curation tools, and safely stored within an online video library.


CrowdOptic technology is protected by U.S. Patent 8,527,340, U.S. Patent 9,020,832, Australia Patent No. 2012225536, Japan Patent No. 5530572, Japan Patent No. 5775196, Korea Patent No. 10-1383238, Canadian Patent No. 2,829,597, China Patent No. ZL 201280020614.5, plus six U.S. and three international patents pending.
Real-Time Clusters

Live Streaming and Augmented Reality


Google Glass: CrowdOptic is one of the very few partners certified by Google for its Glass at Work program, and leads the pack with the highest-quality live video streams. Only by modifying Google Glass and running its own proprietary software, CrowdOptic is able to produce high-quality streams and secure the device to be used in any environment. CrowdOptic has also streamlined the navigation of Google Glass by removing unnecessary actions and introducing remote device management controls. Users unfamiliar with Google Glass can now very easily stream from Google Glass simply by putting them on.


Sony SmartEyeglass: CrowdOptic utilizes the augmented reality display of Sony SmartEyeglass to enable users to interact with other wearable devices and cameras around them simply by looking around. Sony SmartEyeglass running CrowdOptic software can show you where the crowd is looking in real-time and enable the user to tap into the view of another camera.


GoPro and other cameras: CrowdOptic supplements live video streams from wearable devices with live video streams from GoPro and other cameras to programmatically capture an event from the best camera view. CrowdOptic patented technology uses device sensor information to determine where cameras are pointed and analyzes each video stream to help determine the best camera view.


High-Quality Live Streams: Video and audio quality are critical to live streaming and CrowdOptic proprietary software produces high-quality streams with a low latency in both high and low bandwidth environments. Each video stream can also support a real-time two way audio conversation from device to console to device.


Streaming from virtually anywhere: From sports venues, hospitals, universities, and moving ambulances, CrowdOptic routinely streams from the most difficult environments over Wi-Fi, 4G, LTE, and within the licensed spectrum. CrowdOptic engineering and integration expertise enables partners to live stream from virtually anywhere.
Live Video Streaming

Enterprise Live Streaming Console


The live video streams from wearables and connected cameras can be viewed and managed in the Enterprise Live Streaming Console. The web-based console is the single point of integration to help the enterprise manage devices, users and content.


Viewing the Stream: Given the right credentials, all the live video streams can be viewed safely on a single webpage in the console, with each stream on the page with its own real-time controls. With this flexibility, a console administrator can set the zoom level of the camera, start/stop the stream, adjust the stream quality, and tag the stream with metadata.


Distributing the Stream: In addition to view the stream in the console, the stream can also be pushed out to additional screens and directly to social media. The administrator can invite a user to view the live stream via a smart phone, push a live stream to a Jumbotron, direct the stream to Twitter, and a host of other options.


2-way voice communication: when streaming from wearable devices such as Google Glass, the console administrator can initiate a 2-way conversation with the person wearing Google Glass. This feature is particularly helpful in field service when an expert is assisting a repair remotely.


Managing Wearables: Designed for the enterprise, the Wearable Application Management (WAM) and Wearable Device Management (WDM) tools track and manage the devices in the field and can update the software remotely using over the air updates. Common administration tasks are tracking device usage and associating a specific device to a specific location.


Managing Users: Managing user access to live video feeds, video archives and console administrator functions is paramount for the enterprise. The console administrator can easily grant and revoke user privileges for specific locations and devices, and the interface is designed to distribute user administration in a scalable fashion.


HIPAA compliance: CrowdOptic software does not collect patient identifiers or personal health information (PHI). Wearable devices, such as Google Glass, do not store any content and are locked down to prevent misuse. All video streams are encrypted from end-to-end and are secured through 256-bit encryption.